Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Everything Right is Wrong Again, Figure Study with Broken Dishes



Figure study of a child in a cupboard with broken dishes. 9" x 12" acrylic on canvas with a 1" profile. Edges not painted. Wired and ready to hang on arrival. by Julie Kwiatkowski Schuler.

Inspired by my children, who were climbing in and out of the cupboard one day, and the They Might Be Giants' song Everything Right is Wrong Again, because I imagined all the dishes were going to get broken, as the dishes referred to in the song met a similar tragic end.

Monday, March 2, 2015

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Figure Study with Broken Dishes, Everything Right is Wrong Again.




Because we listen to a lot of They Might Be Giants at our house, especially when I'm working, this figure study bears the title of a song from The Pink Album that refers to dishes getting broken. It started when my boys were climbing in and out of a cupboard directly behind me while I was working, and I just knew they were going to break everything. I eventually wrangled them and made them each pose for a figure study. My youngest son had the best pose this time, but I promised to do another figure study with the older one.

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Everything Right is Wrong Again



I started a figure study of my youngest son. My children were behind me while I was painting, climbing in and out of the cupboard. I had visions of all the dishes getting broken during this game, which put me in mind of the They Might Be Giants song, Everything Right is Wrong Again. So that is the working title of this figure study. It is sometimes challenging to be a parent, but it is nice to have free models.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Mokomokai





Mokomokai are the preserved heads of the Maori, the indigenous people of New Zealand. They became valuable trade items during the Musket Wars of the 19th century. Horatio Gordon Robley was pictured with his large collection. This painting was inspired by that photograph.
Acrylic on canvas panel 11" x 14" by Julie Kwiatkowski Schuler.

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Monday, February 23, 2015

Mokomokai




Mokomokai are the preserved heads of the Maori, the indigenous people of New Zealand. They became valuable trade items during the Musket Wars of the 19th century. Horatio Gordon Robley was pictured with his large collection. This painting was inspired by that photograph.

Sunday, February 22, 2015

Saturday, February 21, 2015

Mokomokai





Mokomokai are the preserved heads of the Maori, the indigenous people of New Zealand. They became valuable trade items during the Musket Wars of the 19th century. Horatio Gordon Robley was pictured with his large collection. This painting was inspired by that photograph.

Friday, February 20, 2015

Felix




Painting inspired by the story of Saint Felix in the Golden Legend of Jacobus de Voragine. Saint Felix was a third century saint who evaded capture by Roman soldiers by hiding in a vacant house whilst spiders miraculously wove webs across the doorway, making it look like no one had passed through.

Felix here is an intrepid Victorian anthropologist, showing us spider specimens. Behind him is the chemical composition for spider venom written on the chalkboard. An entomologist's reverie.
8" x 10" acrylic on acid free paper by Julie Kwiatkowski Schuler.

Felix does not contain the black bars nor the "My Good Babushka" watermark included here for security and formatting purposes.

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Felix




Felix. Work in progress today.  St. Felix was a third century saint. There is a legend that he hid the persecuted bishop Maximus in a vacant building. Spiders came to his aid and spun webs across the doorway, fooling the centurions into believing no one had passed through that way. The soldiers were diverted and the two prisoners escaped and lived.
My Felix will be showing off his spider specimens. Work in progress by Julie Kwiatkowski Schuler.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Hostetler Blind Family Quartet





Hostetler Family Blind Quartet. 9" x 12" acrylic on acid-free heavy weight paper. Original painting by Julie Kwiatkowski Schuler. Inspired by the Hostetler Blind Family Quartet, a musical group of three brothers and one sister who played in and around the area of Fayette County, Pennsylvania. They were born without eyes.

Supplemental information about these performers has been brought to me by my friend, Derek Pegritz, to whom I am grateful:

"Catherine, Samuel (a.k.a. Jesse Samuel or, sometimes, Samuel Jesse), Bartholomew, and John were the children of Daniel Hostetler and Mary (Gibbons) Hostetler--who were first cousins. Despite being born blind, all four were gifted musicians, and were quite renowned in the Fayette County area. There are rumours, too,--unsubstantiated--that they toured Europe as well. With the exception of Catherine (who lived into her fifties), they enjoyed long lives, and all four are buried with their parents at the Leckey (or Lecks) Cemetery between McClellandtown and Lamberton."

Painting does not contain the "My Good Babushka" watermark, included here for security purposes.